Tag: anger management

Reacting Vs Responding:

Reacting Vs Responding: When it comes to the context of human interactions, communication and relationships, reacting and responding are mistakenly used as synonyms – when really they are different. Scenario: Think about it, when your boss sends you an email that rubs you the wrong way, or when you receive a text that offends you,…
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February 8, 2017 0

Can Anger Be Controlled?

Anger cannot be controlled but our response to anger is in our control. Anger is an automatic response of the nervous system. When it feels threatened the brain floods the body with stress hormones prompting the body’s fight or flight response. It is extremely important to pause and reflect on your anger and the desired…
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January 21, 2015 0

Anger Management 818 Accomplishments for 2011

So often we focus on what’s next on the agenda. This year, Anger Mangagement 818 has decided to review all the accomplishments we have achieved as a company during the year of 2011. Looking back, it seems we have accomplished many important tasks. Anger Management 818 is open to feedback from our community.


February 11, 2012 0

Disrespect

In anger management, the words “respect” and “disrespect” are heard often. Mostly it is about how someone else is disrespectful. So let’s think about what it means to be or feel disrespected. First, let’s define the term “Respect.” According to Dictionary.com, respect is defined as deference to a right, privilege, privileged position; proper acceptance or…
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October 7, 2011 6

Reacting versus Responding

Many people wonder how a situation escalates so quickly. Questions such as, “What happened?” or “How did he end up leaving?” are asked, yet there is not much success with finding a fulfilling answer.

When we react, we are emotionally charged. Responding rather than reacting requires for you to wait until you have cooled off, and worked through the issue, prior to replying to the situation. For example, if my supervisor criticizes me at work, I will feel angry and resentful, and I will act withdrawn (reacting). How I can respond is to recognize that my work does not have to be perfect, and that my supervisor was probably only trying to help me (responding).

If you are interested in learning more about reacting versus responding, you can contact one of our clinicians to work with you.


August 8, 2011 5

Why Guilt is Good…

Some feelings tend to be disturbing, uncomfortable, torturous, and downright painful. So painful that we often cover these feelings up with depression, or anger, or anything else that will help to cover up or ignore what we’re truly feeling. We might even stop to wonder why we even have these feelings in the first place…
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June 1, 2011 8

Why Anger Can Be Good

Anger gets a bad rap. It always gets blamed for those explosive outbursts you hear about in the news, road rage, post office shootings, and domestic disturbances. I wouldn’t want to be blamed for all those things. Would you? Does anger really deserve such a bad reputation? Could it be possible that anger is actually…
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March 25, 2011 2